Mindfulness and dissociation

I’m coping well with my ‘voices’ these days but still feel very ‘mindless’ and dissociated.

Dissociation and Mindfulness in Patients with Auditory Verbal Hallucinations.

The very few studies relating mindfulness and dissociation have found a negative association between them (depersonalization and absorption). However, all these studies have been done in non-clinical populations and there are no data on the relationship between these variables in psychiatric patients with auditory hallucinations. This study was designed to study the relationship between mindfulness and the two dissociative variables, absorption and depersonalization, as well as their predictive power for the severity of auditory hallucinations and the distress they cause in a clinical population. Fifty-five psychiatric patients with hallucinations were given the following tests: MAAS (Brown & Ryan, 2003), TAS (Tellegen & Atkinson, 1974), CDS (Sierra & Berrios, 2000), PSYRATS (Haddock, McCarron, Tarrier, & Faragher, 1999), and PANSS (Kay, Opler, & Lindenmayer, 1988). A significant negative correlation was found between mindfulness and the dissociative variables, and between mindfulness and the distress caused by the hallucinations. A positive correlation was also found between absorption and distress caused by hallucinations and between depersonalization and their severity. Finally, the variable with the most predictive power for severity of the voices was depersonalization, and the variable with the most predictive power for distress caused by the voices was mindfulness. Interventions addressing training in mindfulness techniques could diminish the distress associated with hearing voices.

Rufus May’s excellent site has interesting articles on mindfulness and dissociation.

I need to work on the following:

●    Acceptance – accepting what is present rather than denying it or wishing it was not there.
●    Non-judging – observing objects and events without evaluating them.
●    Patience – we stay with the present moment and don’t rush towards the next exciting event, we focus on the unique unfolding of what is happening now.
●    Beginners mind – seeing things with an open mind and noticing their unique qualities.
●    Letting go – developing the ability to switch attention and let go of one object of concentration and focus on another
●    Being with – as opposed to trying to fix or control things or achieve constantly
●    Non-striving – by accepting the present moment and its accompanying sensations we let go of constantly striving for better moments.  We focus on the journey rather than just the destination.
●    Non-attachment – this is about relating to things with kindness but not clinging onto them recognising that everything changes.

Mindfulness in schizophrenia: Associations with self-reported motivation, emotion regulation, dysfunctional attitudes, and negative symptoms.

Mindfulness and Metta-based Trauma Therapy (MMTT): Initial Development and Proof-of-Concept of an Internet Resource. 

Mindfulness & Metta Trauma Therapy (MMTT) is a self-help therapy for improving self-regulation in people suffering from trauma and stressor-related disorders that can be practiced online. The therapy was developed by Dr. Paul Frewen, a psychologist at Western University, Canada. MMTT involves learning to apply 6 therapeutic principles to your everyday life through the practice of a reflective journaling exercise we call Mindful and Metta Moments, as well as through the practice of guided meditations. The 6 therapeutic principles of MMTT are: 1) Presence, 2) Awareness, 3) Letting-Go, 4) Metta, 5) Re-Centering and De-Centering, and 6) Acceptance and Change.


Trauma and Stressor-related Disorders

Trauma and stressor-related disorders are psychological problems that are caused by the experience of one or more traumatic life events or relationships. Different researchers and clinicians define traumatic life events in different ways; some definitions are very broad and general, whereas others are more specific. For the purposes of this website, we define traumatic life events and relationships somewhat broadly as any life event or relationship that caused a person psychological harm that continues to be experienced long after the event occurred or the relationship ended. Examples of traumatic life events include:

  • rejection, abandonment or betrayal following the ending of a close and loving relationship;
  • experiences of complicated or extended grieving following the loss of a loved one (complicated bereavement);
  • being physically or sexually assaulted, or witnessing or finding out that this happened to another person you care about;
  • being verbally or emotionally abused or bullied, including as a child;
  • being abused, mistreated or neglected by caregivers when you were a child;
  • being in a life threatening or physically disabling event, for example, as in military combat, a serious car accident, or a fire, workplace accident or natural disaster;
  • experiences of guilt and shame for physical or psychological harm that you have caused another person.

Post-Traumatic Growth Follow Up: What It Takes To Grow From Tough Times

Compassion and the Voice of the Tormentor

See more at Voice Hearers Connect

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