Supplementation of antipsychotic treatment with sarcosine-G1yT1 inhibitor-causes changes of glutamatergic 1NMR spectroscopy parameters in the left hippocampus in patients with stable schizophrenia. (2015)

Supplementation of antipsychotic treatment with sarcosine-G1yT1 inhibitor-causes changes of glutamatergic 1NMR spectroscopy parameters in the left hippocampus in patients with stable schizophrenia.

Glutamatergic system, the main stimulating system of the brain, plays an important role in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Hippocampus, a structure crucial for memory and cognitive functions and rich in glutamatergic neurons, is a natural object of interest in studies on psychoses. Sarcosine, a glycine transporter (GlyT-1) inhibitor influences the function of NMDA receptor and glutamate-dependent transmission. The aim of the study was to assess the effects of sarcosine on metabolism parameters in the left hippocampus in patients with schizophrenia. Assessments were performed using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectroscopy (1.5T). Fifty patients diagnosed with schizophrenia (DSM-IV-TR), with dominant negative symptoms, in stable clinical condition and stable antipsychotics doses were treated either with sarcosine (n=25) or placebo (n=25). Spectroscopic parameters were evaluated within groups and between two groups before and after 6-month intervention. All patients were also assessed with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). In the sarcosine group, after 6-month treatment, we found significant decrease in hippocampal Glx/Cr (Glx-complex of glutamate, glutamine and GABA, Cr-creatine) and Glx/Cho (Cho-choline), while N-acetylaspartate (NAA), myo-inositol (mI), Cr and Cho parameters remained stable along the study and also did not differ significantly between both groups. This is the first study showing that a pharmacological intervention in schizophrenia, particularly augmentation of the antypsychotic treatment with sarcosine, may reverse the pathological increase in glutamatergic transmission in the hippocampus. The results confirm involvement of glutamatergic system in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and demonstrate beneficial effects of GlyT-1 inhibitor on the metabolism in the hippocampus and symptoms of schizophrenia.

“Sarcosine – an exogenous amino acid – is serving in the brain as a glycine transporter type 1 (GlyT-1) inhibitor and as a source of glycine (natural coagonist of the NMDA receptor, metabolized from sarcosine by sarcosine dehydrogenase). It was reported to be effective in treating negative and cognitive symptoms .

Supplementation of sarcosine at a 2 grams daily dose is supposed to increase glycine concentration and normalize hypofunction of the NMDA receptors, which are present in high density in the the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus – areas associated with development of cognitive and negative symptomatology”

table 3
Study results

“We conclude that augmentation of the antypsychotic treatment with sarcosine may reverse the increase in glutamatergic transmission in the left hippocampus in schizophrenia along with improvement of mental state, assessed with the PANSS. The results confirm involvement of glutamatergic system in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and demonstrate beneficial effects of GlyT-1 inhibitor on the metabolism in the hippocampus.”

See more:

Sarcosine Therapy – A New Complementary Direction for Schizophrenia Treatment?

Safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of open label sarcosine added on to anti-psychotic treatment in schizophrenia – preliminary study. (2015)

Glycinergic, NMDA and AMPA augmentation – a review

GlyT1 inhibitors

Adding Sarcosine to Antipsychotic Treatment in Patients with Stable Schizophrenia Changes the Concentrations of Neuronal and Glial Metabolites in the Left Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex.

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